2017 Nebula Novelette Nominees

SFWA Nebula Awards

This week we’re shaking up our usual format, and taking on the Nebula nominees in the Novelette category — those of them available online, anyway.

So we’ll be discussing:

We’ll also discuss “Red in Tooth and Cog,” by Cat Rambo, which was nominated for a Nebula, but fell between the cracks of the wordcount categories (and ultimately judged in the short story category, at 7,070 words).

What do you think of this batch of Nebula nominees? Which make you squee, and which make you snark? Join the discussion in the comments!

“You’ll Surely Drown Here If You Stay,” by Alyssa Wong

Uncanny May/June 2016
Uncanny May/June 2016

“You’ll Surely Drown Here If You Stay,” by Alyssa Wong.
Published in Uncanny, May/June 2016.


Vanessa Fogg sums this one up:

Her latest story in Uncanny Magazine is classic Alyssa Wong: intense, visceral writing; searing imagery; building horror. An orphan in this alternate Wild West can bring dead things back to life—and perhaps put them to rest as well. Skeletons rise, dead things dance, and there’s an unforgettable scene involving a chicken. In the end, it’s also a beautiful story of loss and love.

The reviewers at OneMore dig deep into the piece:

Full disclosure: I love the desert and I love myth-making. Any story that can combine the two, bringing the desert to haunting life until you can hear the dead and smell the hot breeze is almost certain to win me over.

(…) Is it about trying to come to terms with your heritage? About not fitting in and being unsure where there’s a place for you? Possibly. It’s certainly about love and loyalty and what we’re prepared to sacrifice. And it’s definitely uncanny. Excellent stuff.

Charles Payseur observes:

This is a story that equal parts strange and bleak and beautiful to me, like the desert. Like doomed love. (…) In many ways I read the story as about how sometimes there’s no escaping a situation, a place. Sometimes who you are, who your parents are, and the machinations and plots of those with more power, are damning and inescapable. Which is not to say that those situations are hopeless.

And at Hollywood The Write Way, Melody writes:

This story is a great exploration of what it’s like living with a curse in a survival of the fittest, use everyone for personal gain society, what it means to embrace your identity. It’s a fine exploration of power and expectations, love and boundaries, fear and the limitations it brings, it allows for, it thrives in. Grief and holding on. Moving on. What an intensely rich and sobering mirror of real life.


What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments below!

“Seasons of Glass and Iron,” by Amal El-Mohtar

“Seasons of Glass and Iron,” by Amal El-Mohtar.
Short story. Published in The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales , and reprinted in Uncanny Magazine, November/December 2016.

This was a #ShortFictionSunday recommendation that caught my eye:

Rocket Stack Rank sums the story up well:

Tabitha is an irresistible force who meets an immovable object, Amira. They cease to be who they were and become a couple–something entirely new. Continue reading ““Seasons of Glass and Iron,” by Amal El-Mohtar”