“Seven Birthdays,” by Ken Liu

“Bridging Infinity” Anthology, ed. Jonathan Strahan

“Seven Birthdays,” by Ken Liu.
Published in Bridging Infinity, reprinted in Tor.Com.

Speculiction writes:

Contextualizing the contemporary Western situation with some simple but effective bits of far-future imagination, Liu keeps things relevant by understanding the idea that problems will always exist, and thus what matters is our approach—our attitude—toward them.

Rocket Stack Rank gives the story four stars, citing pros and cons:

Pro: (…) The ending is heartwarming because, after all that time, Mia finally has the right words–and they’re noble, inspiring words. At the large-scale level, it’s a great description of human evolution and transformation into a galaxy-spanning civilization–if civilization is even the right word for something so grand.

Con: There’s little action and no tension in the story, which mostly consists of a recitation of events that transpired.

Tangent Online reviewer Jason McGregor comments:

While this story doesn’t seem to be as free from a sort of historical dualism (which leads to a tincture of human self-loathing which is mostly balanced by an explicit appreciation of our “wondrous” quality) as it is from the human vs. nature dualism that it explicitly disavows and does seem like yet another climate change story at first, it does move on to bigger and better things which do involve mega-engineering and a bit of “gosh wow” and is a good execution of the tried-and-true and fitting “time lapse” structure.


What did you think of “Seven Birthdays”? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

“The City Born Great,” by N.K. Jemisin

The City Born Great, by N.K. Jemisin. Art by Richie Pope.

“The City Born Great,” by N.K. Jemisin.
Published in Tor.Com, September 2016.

This one runs the gamut, review-wise. Let’s go from down to up…

Seraph, at Tangent Online, calls it:

A profanity-riddled, drug-induced psychotic episode of a paranoid-schizophrenic young man, with no justification for an abrupt and unconnected ending. That’s really the most positive I can be.

Rocket Stack Rank pegs this “Average,” with pros and cons:

Pro: The narrator really does want to do something creative. He sings, he draws, and he despairs, because he knows he has no future. Paulo saves him, and he brings New York to life and defeats a monster with it.

Con: It’s hard to consistently suspend disbelief for this one. Swinging bridges and neighborhoods into action against a Cthulhu-like creature is hard to credit.

A.C. Wise writes,

“The City Born Great” captures the personality of New York City wonderfully, its rough edges, and its unbreakable spirit. The places we live are imbued with the personality of their citizens, and full of quirks all their own. As someone who lived in Jersey and worked in NYC for several years, I fully admit this story had me wanting to punch the air and yell, “Hell, yeah! No cosmic horror is taking my city down!”

 

“The Story of Kao Yu,” by Peter Beagle

The Story of Kao Yu (ebook cover)

“The Story of Kao Yu,” by Peter Beagle.
Short story. Published in Tor.com, December 2016.


Rocket Stack Rank gives this one five stars, calling the story “Beautiful, moving, and thought-provoking”.

Ron Andrea is less impressed: “Well-written and interesting, but there’s no payoff”.

I’d expected to find a little more discussion of a new Peter Beagle story — but then, that’s what we’re here for 🙂

What did you think of it? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

 

“Finnegan’s Field,” by Angela Slatter

“Finnegan’s Field,” by Angela Slatter. Tor.com. Novelette.

I loved Slatter’s “Of Sorrow and Such” last year; excellent dark fantasy, to the hilt. This one looks like it touches on fae and changeling children.

Content Warning: Difficult material in this one. Specific content warning in the first comment.

Read the story:

Finnegan’s Field