“The Venus Effect,” by Joseph Allen Hill

Lightspeed, December 2016
Lightspeed, December 2016

“The Venus Effect,” by Joseph Allen Hill.
Novelette. Published in Lightspeed, December 2016.

I’ve chosen this story based on Abigail Nussbaum’s strong recommendation:

It’s not an exaggeration to say that stories like this one are why I keep doing this, rooting through hundreds of short stories on the off chance of happening on one, by an author I’ve never heard of, that completely blows me away.  I don’t want to say too much about “The Venus Effect”‘s plot, both because it’s a surprise worth preserving, and because to describe the story is to make it sound like so much less than what it is–too academic, too gimmicky, too preachy.  This is a story about stories, and about who gets to be the hero in the core stories of our genre.  It shouldn’t work–the tack Hill chooses should come off as glib, and the structure he comes up with should devolve into repetition–and yet, amazingly, it does.  If there’s one story on this list that I’d like you to read, “The Venus Effect” is it.

If Nussbaum wants us to read it, then read it we shall!


What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

2017 Nebula Novelette Nominees

SFWA Nebula Awards

This week we’re shaking up our usual format, and taking on the Nebula nominees in the Novelette category — those of them available online, anyway.

So we’ll be discussing:

We’ll also discuss “Red in Tooth and Cog,” by Cat Rambo, which was nominated for a Nebula, but fell between the cracks of the wordcount categories (and ultimately judged in the short story category, at 7,070 words).

What do you think of this batch of Nebula nominees? Which make you squee, and which make you snark? Join the discussion in the comments!

“The Red Thread,” by Sofia Samatar

“The Red Thread,” by Sofia Samatar. Lighspeed Magazine.

Read the story:

The Red Thread

“The Plausibility of Dragons,” by Kenneth Schneyer

“The Plausibility of Dragons,” by Kenneth Schneyer .

Recommended by Levana Taylor, and caught my eye because she described it as ” cleverfun, and a good story of friendship,” which I could use after the last few heavy pieces 🙂

Read the story:

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/the-plausibility-of-dragons/