“The Person You Are Trying To Reach Is Not Available,” by Andrea Chapela

“The Person You Are Trying To Reach Is Not Available,” by Andrea Chapela.
Translated from Spanish by Andrea Chapela. Published in Samovar, June 2017. Short story.

Strange Horizons have published their second issue of Samovar, the magazine celebrating translated speculative fiction from around the world. Like last post, I’ve leaped on a brand new story which looks intriguing, so no outside reviews yet – we’ve got a clean slate for this one.

What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

“Beauty, Glory, Thrift,” by Alison Tam

Cover by Melanie Cook

“Beauty, Glory, Thrift,” by Alison Tam.
Novelette. Published by Book Smugglers Publishing, June 13th 2017.


On a lost planet in the depths of space, goddess-sisters Beauty, Glory and Thrift split their time between stasis and bickering, forever waiting for new visitors to their forgotten temple. Enter a thief, who comes searching for treasure but instead finds Thrift—the least of the goddesses—who offers powers of frugality in exchange for her escape.

And the rest, as they say, is history.


This isn’t quite my typical reading material, which is exactly why I’m curious to try it. That, and the blurb sounds fantastic!

On the Book Smugglers’ Twitter account, they describe “Beauty, Glory, Thrift” as an LGBTQIA title, and also the first of the Book Smugglers’ “Gods and Monsters”-themed short story season.

No reviews yet — here’s our chance to beat the crowds… 😛


What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

 

“Terra Nullius,” by Hanuš Seiner

“Terra Nullius,” by Hanuš Seiner. Translated by Julie Nováková.
Short story. Published in Strange Horizons, March 20th 2017.


It’s Charles Payseur’s review of the piece that I found particularly intriguing, right from the premise:

This is a beautiful and rather haunting story that follows a dramatic confrontation, but only along its peripheral. The story explores the vast worlds inside of alien beings, where one human is diving over and over again to try and find the key to human survival in the face of an ever-adapting enemy. It’s a story of alien invasion, and a sort of invasion that humanity cannot hold out forever against, these aliens capable of taking their experiences and creating a sort of illusory world for their next generation to adapt safe and better, to learn how better to conquer and spread.

Christos Antonaros, at Tangent Online, writes:

An original idea, which dips the reader into the bottom of a river, and even deeper into the terrifying illusions created inside of the guts of five alien behemoths. The setting and structure of the story are attention-grabbing from the very first paragraphs. (…) At some points, especially during sections of dialog, the plot becomes confusing, but the author then gives the reader a plot-twisting conclusion that resolves any questions.

A.C. Wise, in her column for Apex, writes:

Seiner offers up a truly alien mode of being, as well as learning and communication. The story calls into question the line between reality and illusion, at times echoing the unanchored feeling of exploring a new world – neither the characters nor the reader are fully grounded, drifting and making their way through the landscape together.

Rocket Stack Rank is less impressed. The full review (spoilers!) gives the story two stars, saying “The concept is pretty cool,” but “The execution of that idea is awful, and the whole story is a confused mess.”

I’ll close with a return to Payseur’s comments, this time on the themes and resonance of the story:

It’s a hitting story about trying to break this echo-chamber of conditioned abuse that just prepares people for war. (…) What happens when people are so trained and programed just for conflict, just to believe that their illusion is real? There’s a lot going on in the story and it’s nicely built to show the depth of these illusions, how it gets into everything. (…) It’s a story that really dives into illusions and isolation and how the young and conditioned by the older generations. It’s chilling and yet not without a spark of hope. An amazing read!


What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

“The Thule Stowaway,” by Maria Dahvana Headley

Uncanny, Jan/Feb 2017,
Cover by John Picacio

“The Thule Stowaway,” by Maria Dahvana Headley.
Novelette. Published in Uncanny Jan/Feb 2017.

Suggested by Mark Hepworth:

I love “secret history” style stories, which this combines with a carefully crafted nest of narratives.

This one has reactions all over the map, which should make for some interesting discussion!

  • Charles Payseur echoes our recommendation: “This story is something of a Master’s course in nested narratives, unfolding like a puzzlebox that defies reality and is much larger on the inside than it appears.”
  • Tangent Online reviewer Herbert M. Shaw calls it “overlong and burdensome,” and “a rejected plot from the Doctor Who storyboards, featuring Edgar Allan Poe.”
  • Rocket Stack Rank gives it four stars, judging it “rich, complex, rewarding to Poe fans.”
  • SF Bluestocking says: “Rather long and challenging, especially if you don’t know the works and biography of Edgar Allan Poe very well. I could see it being a great favorite for the right reader, however.”
  • Featured Futures sees pros and cons: “Would have interest to some fans of Poe (…) and to those who can get through its over-engineering to enjoy its rococo prose and sneakily involving action.”

What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

“Aunt Dissy’s Policy Dream Book,” by Sheree Renée Thomas

Apex April 2017,
Art by Angelique Shelley

“Aunt Dissy’s Policy Dream Book,” by Sheree Renée Thomas.
Novelette. Published in Apex, April 2017.

Recommended on Twitter by @TroyLWiggins .

Stephanie Wexler at Tangent writes:

Raised by her Aunt Dissy after her mother died, Cassie’s ability to connect with people through dreams has become a torture. The sight overtakes her literally like a force of nature. Each dream vision somehow ends up scarring her physically. (…) There are so many elements to Cassie’s character intertwined with her gifts; the people she meets and helps, and her own journey for balance and self forgiveness turns this story into a wild ride.

Charles Payseur recommends the story, describing it thusly:

The prose is elegant and tied up in dreams because it is in dreams that Cassie has her Sight, that allows her to pierce the veil and see the future. Or some version of it anyway. She’s been told that she’ll not be lucky in love or money, but when a man shows up haunted by a woman he doesn’t know, things are pushed into wholly uncharted territory.

Rocket Stack Rank has mixed feelings, writing:

Pros: Cassie is an interesting character, and her gift is interesting in its own right.(…)
Cons: Her problems all seem to happen because she won’t tell that man his fortune properly. She sure seems to stick with that position for a long time, and it’s not clear why it means so much to her to keep it from him. (…) In the end, nothing has been resolved.


What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!

“And Then There Were (N-One),” by Sarah Pinsker

Uncanny March/April 2017;
Art by Julie Dillon

“And Then There Were (N-One),” by Sarah Pinsker.
Novella. Published in Uncanny, March/April 2017.

Pinsker is a particular favorite of mine, clones and doubles and alternates are a particular favorite of mine, and murder mysteries are awesome! Also, it seems a bunch of other people really liked this story:

“Drop what you’re doing and read ‘And Then There Were (N-One),'” tweeted @SFBluestocking, and in her blog she writes:

Sarah Pinsker’s story of a convention–SarahCon–for Sarah’s from thousands of alternate reality might be my favorite novella of the last several years, to be honest. It’s smart and funny and thoughtful in perfect proportions. It was enchanting from page one, and it’s a story and concept that has been often on my mind ever since I read it.

Rocket Stack Rank awards a rare five stars, calling the story “Intricately plotted, Moving, and Fun.” Full review (spoilers! murder mystery spoilers) is here.


What did you think? Read the story, and join the discussion in the comments!